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  1. #1
    Fish&Fly
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    Practical uses for different types of Spey casts

    There are so many new spey casts being invented that I think it is perhaps time to discuss their merits in actual fishing situations.

    There is no doubt that I am a salmon fisher first and caster second – but I have met many fishers who are exactly the reverse! And I can’t blame them when most of the time when salmon fishing we are casting and not catching fish.

    Anyway let me tell you what I use, when and why. In effect I normally use one of four casts (though keen to hear why you would use one of the others invented).

    Single Spey.
    Always my first choice cast when conditions allow. I find it casts the furthest and creates the least water disturbance. Gentle, sweet and elegant. Does not need too much room behind. I use in still conditions to a medium strong upstream wind.
    Degree of difficulty of learning: Hard

    Snap-T.
    If it is very windy upstream I use the Snap-T in preference to the Single Spey as the loop formation is more controlled and certain. I even use this cast if there is a downstream breeze and I have little room for loop formation on my downstream side, as snapping the loop low can cut the loop into the wind ok. I don’t like the water disturbance of this cast but tolerate it when conditions dictate. I also use this cast in preference to the Single Spey when I want to cast square to the bank or even upstream.
    Degree of difficulty of learning: Medium

    Double Spey.
    The perfect choice in a downstream wind and where there is room for loop formation (it needs more room than the single Spey because the loop is formed between you and the bank – not you and the river as in the single). This is the easiest of all Spey casts to master as timing is not critical and it is a joy to use because it is so effortless.
    Degree of difficulty of learning: Easy

    Snake Roll.
    I use this cast when a gale or very strong wind is blowing downstream. The loop is always below (unlike the Double Spey) and it is very safe and the wind even helps with the loop formation.
    Degree of difficulty of learning: Medium

    These casts do me nicely in the above situations – but I don’t use very heavy flies – If I need to go deep I prefer to use a fast sinking line, short leader and lighter flies. So I don’t worry about Skagit-water-stick type approaches. Perhaps someone could enlighten me about those!

    Regards

    Colin.

    PS. I carry a floating spey line 50ft head with 10ft interchangeable tip and fast sinking spey line 40ft head with 10ft interchangeable tip.

  2. #2
    Junior Member
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    Thanks a million for this,im a novice caster,had a couple lessons and was going to give a snap t a go,was wondering if i would bother ,but i see its practicality now cheers!!

  3. #3
    Fish&Fly
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    I certainly do urge you to learn the snap-T. It is the easiest of the upstream loop casts too!

    All the best

    Colin

  4. #4
    Junior Member
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    I'm very interested in learning the Snap T colin,looks a bit dangerous to me mind!
    Know anyone who could show me the ropes?

  5. #5
    Junior Member
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    il give it a whirl with you tone, its pretty straight forward, snap t circle c, i prefer it to the single spey to be honest,

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