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  1. #1
    Fish&Fly
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    Shocking salmon-exploitation rates by anglers discovered on the Beiar River, Norway

    It comes as no surprise to non-Norwegian anglers to hear of precious adult salmon being killed on Norwegian rivers by anglers who seem either totally unaware of the plight of their river’s salmon populations or simply couldn’t care less. But the results from a recent survey of divers really does come as a shock and perhaps a wake-up call for anglers and river managers alike!

    In order to identify spawning stocks of salmon and sea trout in the Beiar River system a count of spawning fish was conducted. Divers with diving suit, mask and snorkel carried out a detailed survey in October and November 2010.

    The Beiar River system consists of the tributaries Tollåga, Gjeddåga and the main Beiar River itself. Flow and visibility in the water was satisfactory for the safe implementation and good fish counting.

    On October 25th Tollåga and Gjeddåga were both investigated by two divers. On November 3rd and 4th, three divers were used on the main river.

    The results were a shock. A total of only 511 wild salmon, 3 farmed salmon (0.6%) and 3,151 sea trout were counted in the whole river system. Of sea trout, approximately 41% were immature individuals.

    According to the official catch statistics for the Beiar River system in 2010, 893 salmon were caught and kept. Which means that out of the 1,404 that entered the river over 63% were caught and killed by rod-anglers! Remember this is 63% of the total salmon run!

    If these statistics are to believed (and it is hard to grasp the implications of this if true) then it is little wonder that most salmon rivers in Norway are in decline whereas in Iceland, Scotland, England & Wales (where catch & release is accepted) they are on the increase. In some places dramatically so.

    Compare two similar rivers: the Dee in Scotland (>90% Catch & Release) and the Numedal in Norway (<10% Catch & Release):



    The Beiar river’s angler-attitude really beggars belief because only a couple of decades ago the river had to be closed for years and poisoned to rid itself of the salmon parasite Gyrodactylis salaris. Yet from the dead the river has risen again – only to be knocked back by anglers who, you would think, this time around, would be nurturing and safe-guarding the salmon as if precious children. Shame on them.

    However this is a nationwide problem. With the added pressures of under-regulated fish farming, over exploitation by commercial netting and Gyrodactylis salaris infections, Norway’s reluctance to adopt catch & release will surely be the final nail in the Norwegian salmon coffin. RIP.

  2. #2
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    Re: Shocking salmon-exploitation rates by anglers discovered on the Beiar River, Norw

    A real worry. Look at last years trophy fish on a famous Norwegian river : http://www.lakseborsen.com/index.php?laksebilder

    Not one is alive to fight another day.

  3. #3
    Fish&Fly
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    Re: Shocking salmon-exploitation rates by anglers discovered on the Beiar River, Norw

    Yes the downward trend on the Stjordal (2000 to 2010) is -51.37%. That is, catches have halved over the period.

    This to me is a heart breaker:


    44.5lb (20.24Kg)

    Ikke langt unna rekord | op.no


    A trophy salmon from the ailing Numedal. Surely this fish was extremely precious for the future, why deny the river the genes? Madness. The Numedal catch trend (2000 to 2010) is -78.69%. The river is magnificent - its guardians are not.

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