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  1. #1
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    Question Anatomy of a salmon pool

    Hello everybody,
    my first (silly) question as a newcomer may annoy you all, but being a novice salmon addict and speaking Flemish (of all things ) i'm a bit confused. Reading everything about salmon angling i can lay my hands on i stumble upon words as neck, head, tail, boulder, eddies, glides, left & right side etc.,etc. Now i know it's not easy to determine where the salmon lie in a pool, but it would help a lot if newbies like me knew what part of a pool their looking at!! Especially because certain texts are completely contradictory... So is there somebody out there who's willing to do a decent and final "anatomy of a salmon pool" including brief descriptions of all the words used? I'm sure a lot of beginners (who dare not ask it) would be grateful for your help...

    Many thanks upfront!

    Johan

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by lhomme View Post
    my first (silly) question as a newcomer may annoy you all, but being a novice salmon addict and speaking Flemish (of all things ) i'm a bit confused. Reading everything about salmon angling i can lay my hands on i stumble upon words as neck, head, tail, boulder, eddies, glides, left & right side etc.,etc.
    What a good question - and welcome to the forum.

    Certainly reading where salmon lie at different heights and temperatures is a vital skill to learn. When you don’t have much time on a water the ghillie/guide's advice becomes invaluable. Nevertheless, a thoroughly enjoyable part of salmon fishing is learning and I particularly enjoy visiting new beats and taking my time to study the river landscape. And you are quite correct, terminology is important when discussing such things. When I talk about a river – what nomenclature do I use?

    1. Neck or throat if very narrow.
    2. Fan or riffle if it has a nice broken flow
    3. Pool
    4. Glide
    5. Tail

    I’m not sure if this is the accepted norm – just what I use. I’m off to find my old Geography text books!


    Colin

  3. #3
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    Have a look at this drawing of a salmon pool.



    Shows traditional lies and movement of fish through pool.
    regards
    bert

  4. #4
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    Much appreciated!

    Thanks a lot Colin and Bert,

    the mist is clearing, but something tells me we're not there yet. Where are all these pro's with bags of salmon under their belt? I can hear them saying to each other: "i got that one in the pocket near the tail, just where the glide flows into white water..." or something of a kind. Come on guys, it can't be that hard to put these terms (and a lot more) on a map? All these words must have an etymological history, where do they come from, to what do they refer? I'm taking a wild guess at two of them : Head and tail. Assuming that 99/°° of the salmon anglers start fishing a pool upstream, gradually working their way downstream and knowing that salmon lie facing the current, one could say the angler passes the head of the fish first and then the tail... is it safe to assume then that in the old times someone started saying : "I fished that pool from the head right down to the tail". Or is it the other way around? I don't know, correct me if i'm wrong. Please...

    Thanks again Colin and Bert,

    Johan

    Just thought of something: if Colin put his words on Bert 's map the job is nearly done

  5. #5
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    1. Neck or throat if very narrow.
    2. Fan or riffle if it has a nice broken flow
    3. Pool
    4. Glide
    5. Tail

    Johan.

    Different countries use different words to disect the make up of a "Pool"

    I am Scottish and my preferred terminlogy is:

    1. Start, Head, Neck or Throat of a Pool (the narrower it gets, the more the description moves to the right!) Sometimes, there are few distinguishing features that mark the end of one Pool and the start of another Pool. The most common would be a drop in the river level, say 2-3 feet between the Tail of one Pool and the Head, Neck, Throat etc of the next Pool

    2. Run or Stream. A run or stream can often be quite long easily 100 metres or more on bigger rivers and 10 metres on smaller ones

    3. Glide or Stream (what defines 2 from 3 is that the Glide is that the water is slowing down even more and becomes calmer the further it is from the Run or Stream

    4. Tail - the clear and geographically obvious end of the Pool. Again, it may often feature a drop of water into the start of the Head of the next "Pool"

    As far as I am concerned, a Pool can have several "lies or pools" throughout its course but resident fish are most likely to remain in the "pool" parts of a Pool.

    Running fish tend to be caught at the Tail or head or run of a Pool.

    Confusing is it not?

    Hope the above is of some use but even I have to adapt to cololquiallsims which vary from river to river in Scotland

    humber123

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by lhomme View Post
    Hello everybody,
    my first (silly) question as a newcomer may annoy you all, but being a novice salmon addict and speaking Flemish (of all things ) i'm a bit confused. Reading everything about salmon angling i can lay my hands on I stumble upon words as neck, head, tail, boulder, eddies, glides, left & right side etc...

    Hi Johan (again)


    I see you have had most of your questions answered and the thread is becoming informative.

    "Left and right side" you asked? In salmon fishing it is always left or right whilst looking downstream. Fairly obvious you might think; and this is the way most rule books operate. However some of the classic early fly fishing books adopted looking upstream, as that is how the dry fly trout angler, and clubs, of the day addressed the water.
    I don't have any of my historic books with me over the Christmas break, but this was certainly the case a century ago. In the case of the river Wye, Augustus Grimble, in a 1903 book, conveniently refered to "the Radnorshire side" rather than left bank looking downstream... always the better side.



    Terms I'm not sure about are "pocket water" and, in Scotland, "cauld".
    I know cauld refers to a weir, but is it of a special type or construction?

  7. #7
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    Thanks guys!

    Been away and found your replies just now, much appreciated. Will work on a drawing of a "typical" salmon pool and post it asap for you to correct it.

    For now, a happy newyear to all and everyone on the salmon forum!!

    Best regards,

    Johan

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Editor View Post
    1. Neck or throat if very narrow.
    2. Fan or riffle if it has a nice broken flow
    3. Pool
    4. Glide
    5. Tail
    I forgot a word I use:

    lip

    The lip is the very last part of the pool - the 'seam' between it and the next pool. I always fish the lip and often suprised that a fish takes - even though I know it often happens!

    cb

    PS> Happy New Year to all!

  9. #9
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    thx for your info

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