Oxidative Stability of Polyunsaturated Edible Oils Mixed With Microcrystalline Cellulose
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Abstract The oxidative stability of mixtures of edible oils containing polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was investigated. The mixtures studied consisted of oils of either camelina (CAM), cod liver (CLO), or salmon (SO) mixed with either colloidal or powdered MCC. A 50:50 (w/w) ratio of oil:MCC resulted in an applicable mixture containing high levels of PUFA edible oil and dietary fiber. The oxidative stability of the formulated mixtures and the pure oils was investigated over a period of 28 days. The peroxide value (PV) was assessed as a parameter for primary oxidation products and dynamic headspace gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to analyze secondary volatile organic compounds (VOC). CAM and the respective mixtures were oxidatively stable at both 4 and 22 C during the storage period. The marine oils and the respective mixtures were stable at 4 C. At 22 C, an increase in hydroperoxides was found, but no increase in VOC was detected during the time-frame investigated. At 42 C, prominent increases in PV and VOC were found for all oils and mixtures. Hexanal, a common marker for the degradation of n-6 fatty acids, propanal and 2,4-heptadienal (E,E), common indicators for the degradation of n-3 fatty acids, were among the volatiles detected in the headspace of oils and mixtures. This study showed that a mixture containing a 50:50 ratio of oil:MCC can be obtained by a low-tech procedure that does not induce oxidation when stored at low temperatures during a period of 1 month.




  • Content Type Journal Article
  • Pages 1-13
  • DOI 10.1007/s11746-011-1865-1
  • Authors
    • Linda C. Saga, Department of Chemistry, Biotechnology and Food Science, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, 1432 Aas, Norway
    • Elling-Olav Rukke, Department of Chemistry, Biotechnology and Food Science, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, 1432 Aas, Norway
    • Kristian Hovde Liland, Department of Chemistry, Biotechnology and Food Science, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, 1432 Aas, Norway
    • Bente Kirkhus, Nofima AS, Norwegian Institute of Food, Fisheries and Aquaculture Research, Osloveien 1, 1430 Aas, Norway
    • Bjrg Egelandsdal, Department of Chemistry, Biotechnology and Food Science, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, 1432 Aas, Norway
    • Jan Karlsen, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1068, Blindern, 0316 Oslo, Norway
    • Jon Volden, Department of Chemistry, Biotechnology and Food Science, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, 1432 Aas, Norway





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